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Evil Penevil

Under 300 Baht ... And Good!

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6 hours ago, Odense said:

Did you also try the chili (on another visit) - is it good and tasty without being too hot?

I haven't tried it yet but I will, hopefully this week.

Evil

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6 hours ago, Midnight Moon said:

Thanks again Evil. Are these weekly 300 baht hunts or is there no pattern to these meals?

It's pretty much random regarding which restaurant I visit, but there is also an element of a hunt to it.  I know there is a huge interest from board members in meals under 300 baht, so I try to include them as often as I can.  

Evil

3 hours ago, NewAmsterdam said:

I've never seen Chili on the menu at a Mexican restaurant anywhere but Thailand. Is this a UK thing?

Taco Taco bills itself as both Mexican and Tex Mex and chili con carne falls squarely on the Tex Mex side.  Despite the Spanish name, chili con carne  is as American as apple pie (which of course is English and German in origin).  Chili con carne has nothing to do with traditional Mexican cuisine, but is a result of cowboy and wagon-train one-pot cooking in the Old West.  Any Mexican restaurant that strives to be authentic wouldn't have chili con carne on its menu.  However, some Mexican restaurants, even in Mexico, offer it because they know it is a favorite among American and other tourists.  

Like pizza, spaghetti and hamburgers, chili con carne has spread widely throughout the world and local variations often have little resemblance to the original.  Even in the U.S., Texas chili purists become outraged if "a bowl of red" contains beans or ground beef.

Evil

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Just now, Evil Penevil said:

It's pretty much random regarding which restaurant I visit, but there is also an element of a hunt to it.  I know there is a huge interest from board members in meals under 300 baht, so I try to include them as often as I can.  

Evil

Taco Taco bills itself as both Mexican and Tex Mex and chili con carne falls squarely on the Tex Mex side.  Despite the Spanish name, chili con carne  is as American as apple pie (which of course is English and German in origin).  Chili con carne has nothing to do with traditional Mexican cuisine, but is a result of cowboy and wagon-train one-pot cooking in the Old West.  Any Mexican restaurant that strives to be authentic wouldn't have chili con carne on its menu.  However, some Mexican restaurants, even in Mexico, offer it because they know it is a favorite among American and other tourists.  

Like pizza, spaghetti and hamburgers, chili con carne has spread widely throughout the world and local variations often have little resemblance to the original.  Even in the U.S., Texas chili purists become outraged if "a bowl of red" contains beans or ground beef.

Evil

Sorry I've eaten Tex Mex all my life and never seen Chili Con Carne/Chili on any menu in Texas or Mexico or anywhere else for that matter except Thailand. @vpi78  

In fact it's just called Chili in Texas no one ever says Chili Con Carne .

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I went to Little India yesterday , popodums , chicken tikka massala , Pilau rice and garlic nan..

Was ok for 260 ...The nan was the best I have had on the island...

They do a special every day , but was the first time I went there..

Regards

Chase up Charlie 

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2 minutes ago, Parky said:

I went to Little India yesterday , popodums , chicken tikka massala , Pilau rice and garlic nan..

Was ok for 260 ...The nan was the best I have had on the island...

They do a special every day , but was the first time I went there..

Regards

Chase up Charlie 

Went there years ago with Fred's friend Paul whose dad owns the Wigan Athletics. Wonder if he is still around pattaya.?

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Just now, NewAmsterdam said:

Went there years ago with Fred's friend Paul whose dad owns the Wigan Athletics. Wonder if he is still around pattaya.?

No idea , Fred died and there was a tale about his big safe ...will write it here one day... a mate of mine was staying in the same resort , Tulip over Darkside...

 

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29 minutes ago, NewAmsterdam said:

Sorry I've eaten Tex Mex all my life and never seen Chili Con Carne/Chili on any menu in Texas or Mexico or anywhere else for that matter except Thailand. @vpi78  

In fact it's just called Chili in Texas no one ever says Chili Con Carne .

Yes, the name "chili" (sometimes "chilli") is used on menus in the U.S., but that's just a matter of terminology.  Restaurants simply drop the words "con carne" because they are Spanish.  It's a case of different names for the same dish, although there are countless variations to that dish.  

This article explains it quite well:

These 25 Restaurants Serve the Best Chili in America

Here's an excerpt from the introduction to the list:

"When you think about chili, you probably think of a little bowl filled with a soupy mixture of ground beef, tomatoes, spices, and beans topped with sour cream, cheese, and onions. While that certainly qualifies as chili, it’s far from the only kid on the block. For today’s ranking, we’re defining chili as the dish it got its name from, chili con carne; that is, chili that contains beef (or another red meat) and red chiles or chile powder, with beans, tomatoes, other spices, and toppings as optional additions. "

Evil
 

 

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1 hour ago, Parky said:

I went to Little India yesterday , popodums , chicken tikka massala , Pilau rice and garlic nan..

Was ok for 260 ...The nan was the best I have had on the island...

They do a special every day , but was the first time I went there..

Regards

Chase up Charlie 

Don’t worry about the calories, just sit on that sofa and watch them burn off.

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Just now, Midnight Moon said:

Don’t worry about the calories, just sit on that sofa and watch them burn off.

In gym now .. 10 min cardio then weights 

Regards

99kilo .. 95 the target 

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16 hours ago, NewAmsterdam said:

In fact it's just called Chili in Texas no one ever says Chili Con Carne .

I am guessing most Texans would cringe at the thought of Chili Sin Carne :-D

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On 1/24/2019 at 3:17 AM, Odense said:

I am guessing most Texans would cringe at the thought of Chili Sin Carne 😄

Some Texas chili purists maintain a real "bowl of red" only contains pieces of chuck roast, chilies, onions and a few spices.  Others allow the inclusion of tomatoes or tomato sauce.  There's universal aversion among Texas purists to ground beef and beans.

However, the version with beans has as long a history as Texas chili.  Both were the result of frontier one-pot cooking,  Texas chili began with cowboy chuck wagon cooking, while beans were added by pioneers on wagon trains heading west.  Housewives substituted ground beef for beef chuck in the 20th century because it was cheaper to buy and easier and quicker to cook.

Evil

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D-_Tigglebitties_New-folder_01.jpg.2e2aaf27d20f0d0cad321b40edd031d6.jpg

Tigglebitties Tavern is an American restaurant that serves mainstream U.S. food; Tex-Mex and Mexican-inspired  dishes; and Thai food.  It's located on Soi 17 (aka Soi Regional Land) about five minutes' walk south of the intersection with 3rd Road and ten minutes' walk from Tukcom.

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The great  thing about Tigglebitties is that the owners and kitchen staff understand what American food is about and how it should taste. It's also one of the few restaurants in Pattaya to offer freshly baked U.S.-style biscuits, including biscuits and gravy.  It also features in-house-made U.S. desserts like apple and pumpkin pies and carrot cake.  Prices are quite reasonable for the quality of food and large portions.

It's an open-front bar and restaurant with a casual tavern atmosphere. Plenty of drinking as well as eating goes  on there. The fans keep the interior reasonably cool.  It can get noisy, though, as Soi Regional land is heavily trafficked. Tigglebitties is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

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Every day Tigglebitties has two specials, usually one main dish and one appetizer or snack. They are true specials; they often aren't on the regular menu. The other day I tried the fish taco:

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 In the U.S., these are called Baja fish tacos.  Japanese commercial fishermen were frequent visitors to the coastal cities of Baja California in Mexico during the 1960s.  A group of them once asked a  taco stand operator to batter the fish  tempura-style rather than grilling it.  The new version of the fish taco became popular among local Mexicans and North American tourists, except they favored a crispier crust.  A U.S. college student was so impressed with the Baja fish taco he opened a restaurant serving them in San Diego in 1983.  He now operates a chain of 200 fish taco restaurants.

Here's what I got:

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That's a lot of food on the plate for 160 baht!

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Everything- the fish, veggies and tortillas- was fresh and tasted fine, although I could have done with less lettuce and more salsa.  I had to use a knife and fork to eat the mound of green stuff, but a taco is a quintessential finger food. 

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The original Baja fish tacos were  served in corn tortillas and topped with purple cabbage, salsa and Mexican crema (similar to crème fraiche), but since moving across the border to the U.S.,  fish tacos have taken on many variations.

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 Each of the fish fillets was good-sized and flaky with a crisp batter.  I had no real complaint with the tacos, just some niggling about details. Were they the best fish tacos I ever had?  No, but they were good and they aren't very common in Pattaya.

A breakfast sandwich  with a Jimmy-Dean-style sausage patty, fried egg and cheese on a in-house-made biscuit is another classic American dish and well worth 150 baht.

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It's the biscuit that makes the sandwich for me, but the sausage patty was also good.

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I topped off the sandwich with a piece of in-house carrot cake.  It was delicious.  Neither the cream cheese frosting  nor the cake were too sweet and the frosting had the proper tang. The crushed walnuts atop the frosting was a really good touch.  

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The Monday specials at Tigglebitties center on  BBQ ribs and chicken:

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It's a good way to satisfy a BBQ fix at a fair price.  The pics Tigglebitties uses to illustrate its specials correspond closely to what you get on your plate.

Bottom line:  Tigglebitties is one of the best options in Pattaya for American food- and that includes Tex-Mex and Mexico-inspired dishes.  The main dishes and sides, such as coleslaw and potato salad, taste like they would back in the USA.  The staff is friendly and speaks better English than is often the case in Pattaya restaurants.   Prices  are reasonable given the quality of the food and the size of the portions.

Evil

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Some pages from the menu at Tigglebitties:

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And a few more specials:

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The pics Tigglebitties uses to illustrate its specials correspond closely to what you get on your plate.

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1 hour ago, NewAmsterdam said:

Best thing about tigglebitties besides the great food and good customer base is the beer prices. Is all beer still 65 baht?

This used to be the local of @davethailand a few years ago. 

Great place and owned by a lovely family. I stayed there in 2017 also, great room.

Ate in there almost everytime I went whether it be a snack or a meal, If you like good Thai food also they are spot on.

:)

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i have ate there several times and always enjoyed it except one time which was my last time a few years ago as i got food poisoning from whatever i had .

up until then id always enjoyed the fayre .

 

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39 minutes ago, mulphy said:

i have ate there several times and always enjoyed it except one time which was my last time a few years ago as i got food poisoning from whatever i had .

up until then id always enjoyed the fayre .

 

If I recall you at Ting Tong Tony both had a little sickness after a visit.  Hope you recovered boss

 

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14 minutes ago, NewAmsterdam said:

If I recall you at Ting Tong Tony both had a little sickness after a visit.  Hope you recovered boss

 

yes , good memory youve got mate .lol.

 

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1 hour ago, aw1 said:

Fkn hell.....looks good ☺️

More than Nando’s here 🤣🤣🤣

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IMG_0085[1].jpg

I hadn't eaten at Jameson's Irish Pub in years but tried it again the other night as I was staying in a hotel nearby.

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It wasn't a convenient location for me, but the main reason I didn't go back often was the funereal interior.  When I visit an Irish pub, I want to be reminded of leprechauns and the Blarney Stone, not haunted  castles, banshees and the Cóiste Bodhar.   Typical American tourist attitude, I know, but I don't like gloomy bars and restaurants.

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The food as I remember it had been good, but friends said it had gone down in recent years.  I did have a good meal there the other night.  The interior, though, was as uninviting as I recalled, except it was as cavernous as before.  Jameson's has been cut in half to make way for a yet-to-open pizza place.

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I had the roast chicken dinner for 245 baht. On the plate I got half a chicken, roast and mashed potatoes, a boast of gravy and the usual medley of boiled veggies.

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The chicken had been roasted properly and was moist.  The potatoes were fine.  The veggies were a bit soft for me, but that's a matter of individual preference. The gravy seemed to a generic out-of-a-package and overly salty, so I didn't bother with it.  In all, it was good meal.  Not outstanding, but good.

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A bottle of water cost 30 baht, so the whole meal put me back 275 baht.

Bottom line:  Jameson's location and gloomy interior are negatives, but based on my chicken dinner, the food wouldn't deter me from another visit if I felt like pub fare.

Here's the location for those unfamiliar with it.

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If you're riding the Second Road baht bus, get off just before Soi 6, cross the street and take Soi 4 to Jameson's.

It has some decent prices on pints during its Happy Hours, but so do many other bars.

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Evil

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Big Kahuna is an American restaurant on Thappraya Road in Jomtien, about 100 meters north of the intersection with Thepprasit Road.  The name, decor and some of the dishes on the menu are Hawaii-inspired, but Big Kahuna mostly offers U.S.-style finger food like burgers, sandwiches and pizza.  It also serves U.S.-style breakfasts, with pancakes a notable item. It occupies the former premises of the defunct Pastrami on Rye and the menu at Big Kahuna reminds of PoR's.

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There's a big kahuna painting on one wall, but the interior isn't dripping with kitschy tiki symbols. 

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In fact. the main dining area is pretty much free of them.  It's a relaxing atmosphere in which to have a meal.

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In the Hawaiian language, "kahuna" can refer to a traditional priest, sorcerer or healer, but also to an "expert" of any sort.  The term "big kahuna" was applied to Hawaii's top surfer and was made popular by a character with that name (played by Cliff Robertson) in the 1959 movie Gidget with Sandra Dee in the title roll.  Today it points to the leading expert or most influential person in any field.  I made me think about who might be Pattaya's "big kahuna."   SmileySignroflmaosmall.gif.6c38330b3e8c3055f6aa80ceed0ba2be.gif

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Link

The other day I had the Small Pancake Special at 98 baht.  It featured a single buttermilk pancake with syrup and butter; an in-house-made sausage patty; fried or scrambled egg; and your choice or coffee, tea or orange or pineapple juice. Considering the pancake was one of the best I'd had in Pattaya, it was certainly value for money at the price.

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The pancake was light and fluffy, exactly how a North American pancake should be.  The egg was fired nicely and the sausage patty was OK, if a bit bland.  It was pancake and not real maple syrup, but you can't expect too much for 98 baht.  

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It wasn't a healthy breakfast unless you're running a marathon directly after, but it sure tasted good.  I wouldn't eat it every day or even every month due to the jolt the syrup  gives your blood sugar levels and I just can't have pancakes without some sort of syrup.

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It was a fair-sized glass of pineapple juice, not the thimble full you get in some restaurants.

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Big Kahuna has some of the best American food in Pattaya, but it's a bit of a trek to go all the way to Jomtien for a burger or sandwich.  Fortunately they have delivery as well for 50 baht extra.  I ordered the Cuban sandwich for lunch yesterday.  It was a bit of a hassle as I've moved out of my condo and am living temporarily in a hotel.  First the girl taking orders  thought I had said, "Reuben sandwich," instead of "Cuban sandwich,"  but I caught that due to the disparity in price she named for the order.  It also took some time to make clear my new address.  I had anticipated that might happen. so I gave her the phone number to the hotel so she could call and get the directions in Thai.  

Forty-five minutes later my order arrived, which was fairly quick given the distance involved.  Big Kahuna didn't use a moto driver for delivery, but the same pretty young waitress who'd served me my pancake breakfast the day before brought me the sandwich.  It consisted of ham, pulled pork. Swiss cheese and slices of dill pickle between the halves of a baguette that had been spread with butter and mustard, then toasted in a sandwich press.  It came with a choice of one side dish and a soft drink and I had picked coleslaw and Coke Zero.  It cost 285 baht plus 50 baht for delivery.

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Some foods don't photograph attractively and a Cuban sandwich is one of them.  I did indeed taste better than it looked and nevertheless was a fair approximation of the Cuban sandwiches you get in Florida or a big city like New York.  

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Cuban sandwiches should be made with Cuban bread, the recipe for which  includes lard as a shortening. This helps give the final loaf an exceptionally crisp crust and and airy. light interior compared to its French and Italian counterparts.  In NYC, I lived close to one of the best Cuban bakeries in the city, so getting Cuban sandwiches with the authentic bread wasn't a problem.  It would almost be an impossibility to find Cuban bread in Thailand and the Big Kahuna's substitution of a French baguette is the only option short of baking Cuban bread itself.

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In the pic above, I've  opened the  sandwich and included the coleslaw, Coke and slice of dill pickle that came with the order.  Both the ham and pulled pork held a high standard.  You can't make a good cuban sandwich from a sow's ear.  I would have liked more mustard on the bread, but that's just personal preference.   -funny-facebook-smile-facesmall.jpg.5d242a5aaf7f0da4e8358441c4301f2b.jpg on the sandwich overall.   The coleslaw was very good, with freshly grated cabbage and carrots.  It wasn't swimming in dressing and celery seeds had been added for flavor.   

Bottom line;  I won't hesitate to return to Big Kahuna to satisfy my infrequent longing for certain types of U.S. food, but I'm more likely to use the delivery option.

The restaurant has numerous specials on food and drink.

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I'll post some menu pages from Big Kahuna's Facebook page as well.  Writing this review has made me think about a Reuben for lunch!

Evil

 

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44 minutes ago, Evil Penevil said:
 

5614_n.jpg.22a857b880e68fd4d9324eefb84158b7.jpg

IMG_0105.jpg.a2ebd3a9b0da43616177bbae0868ab24.jpg

 

Big Kahuna is an American restaurant on Thappraya Road in Jomtien, about 100 meters north of the intersection with Thepprasit Road.  The name, decor and some of the dishes on the menu are Hawaii-inspired, but Big Kahuna mostly offers U.S.-style finger food like burgers, sandwiches and pizza.  It also serves U.S.-style breakfasts, with pancakes a notable item. It occupies the former premises of the defunct Pastrami on Rye and the menu at Big Kahuna reminds of PoR's.

IMG_0085.jpg.df6ba37180e46732d523ddccbfa02d5c.jpg

There's a big kahuna painting on one wall, but the interior isn't dripping with kitschy tiki symbols. 

IMG_0079.jpg.1e5c9f3dd7d2fb0a169c955f067cbf11.jpg

In fact. the main dining area is pretty much free of them.  It's a relaxing atmosphere in which to have a meal.

IMG_0082.jpg.8a8606205c8a4f45fe5ca01dd9b81169.jpg

In the Hawaiian language, "kahuna" can refer to a traditional priest, sorcerer or healer, but also to an "expert" of any sort.  The term "big kahuna" was applied to Hawaii's top surfer and was made popular by a character with that name (played by Cliff Robertson) in the 1959 movie Gidget with Sandra Dee in the title roll.  Today it points to the leading expert or most influential person in any field.  I made me think about who might be Pattaya's "big kahuna."   SmileySignroflmaosmall.gif.6c38330b3e8c3055f6aa80ceed0ba2be.gif

V1_.jpg.1a285d260d850d08fa9f156b2db5044d.jpg

Link

The other day I had the Small Pancake Special at 98 baht.  It featured a single buttermilk pancake with syrup and butter; an in-house-made sausage patty; fried or scrambled egg; and your choice or coffee, tea or orange or pineapple juice. Considering the pancake was one of the best I'd had in Pattaya, it was certainly value for money at the price.

IMG_0087.jpg.ea6e2d7e61dadeb6402ec08477b70ea6.jpg

The pancake was light and fluffy, exactly how a North American pancake should be.  The egg was fired nicely and the sausage patty was OK, if a bit bland.  It was pancake and not real maple syrup, but you can't expect too much for 98 baht.  

IMG_0091.jpg.a7964e6ff23169b97b552858d74a01e1.jpg

It wasn't a healthy breakfast unless you're running a marathon directly after, but it sure tasted good.  I wouldn't eat it every day or even every month due to the jolt the syrup  gives your blood sugar levels and I just can't have pancakes without some sort of syrup.

IMG_0097.jpg.fc4ef9e5e28b962d9a23ca653f41f4a4.jpg

It was a fair-sized glass of pineapple juice, not the thimble full you get in some restaurants.

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Big Kahuna has some of the best American food in Pattaya, but it's a bit of a trek to go all the way to Jomtien for a burger or sandwich.  Fortunately they have delivery as well for 50 baht extra.  I ordered the Cuban sandwich for lunch yesterday.  It was a bit of a hassle as I've moved out of my condo and am living temporarily in a hotel.  First the girl taking orders  thought I had said, "Reuben sandwich," instead of "Cuban sandwich,"  but I caught that due to the disparity in price she named for the order.  It also took some time to make clear my new address.  I had anticipated that might happen. so I gave her the phone number to the hotel so she could call and get the directions in Thai.  

Forty-five minutes later my order arrived, which was fairly quick given the distance involved.  Big Kahuna didn't use a moto driver for delivery, but the same pretty young waitress who'd served me my pancake breakfast the day before brought me the sandwich.  It consisted of ham, pulled pork. Swiss cheese and slices of dill pickle between the halves of a baguette that had been spread with butter and mustard, then toasted in a sandwich press.  It came with a choice of one side dish and a soft drink and I had picked coleslaw and Coke Zero.  It cost 285 baht plus 50 baht for delivery.

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Some foods don't photograph attractively and a Cuban sandwich is one of them.  I did indeed taste better than it looked and nevertheless was a fair approximation of the Cuban sandwiches you get in Florida or a big city like New York.  

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Cuban sandwiches should be made with Cuban bread, the recipe for which  includes lard as a shortening. This helps give the final loaf an exceptionally crisp crust and and airy. light interior compared to its French and Italian counterparts.  In NYC, I lived close to one of the best Cuban bakeries in the city, so getting Cuban sandwiches with the authentic bread wasn't a problem.  It would almost be an impossibility to find Cuban bread in Thailand and the Big Kahuna's substitution of a French baguette is the only option short of baking Cuban bread itself.

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In the pic above, I've  opened the  sandwich and included the coleslaw, Coke and slice of dill pickle that came with the order.  Both the ham and pulled pork held a high standard.  You can't make a good cuban sandwich from a sow's ear.  I would have liked more mustard on the bread, but that's just personal preference.   -funny-facebook-smile-facesmall.jpg.5d242a5aaf7f0da4e8358441c4301f2b.jpg on the sandwich overall.   The coleslaw was very good, with freshly grated cabbage and carrots.  It wasn't swimming in dressing and celery seeds had been added for flavor.   

Bottom line;  I won't hesitate to return to Big Kahuna to satisfy my infrequent longing for certain types of U.S. food, but I'm more likely to use the delivery option.

The restaurant has numerous specials on food and drink.

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I'll post some menu pages from Big Kahuna's Facebook page as well.  Writing this review has made me think about a Reuben for lunch!

Evil

 

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Great breakfasts 🍳 

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