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  • *** Don't forget about this months friday 28th, drinks with vpi78 @ The Rock House on friday... it would be great to see you if your in town...! *** Don't forget about this months friday 28th, drinks with vpi78 @ The Rock House on friday... it would be great to see you if your in town...! *** Don't forget about this months friday 28th, drinks with vpi78 @ The Rock House on friday... it would be great to see you if your in town...! *** Don't forget about this months friday 28th, drinks with vpi78 @ The Rock House on friday... it would be great to see you if your in town...! *** Don't forget about this months friday 28th, drinks with vpi78 @ The Rock House on friday... it would be great to see you if your in town...! *** Don't forget about this months friday 28th, drinks with vpi78 @ The Rock House on friday... it would be great to see you if your in town...!

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/18/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Hey all. New guy here. I've only been to Pattaya three times and have my fourth trip coming up in November. I appreciate being approved for access to this site and I look forward to reading more about Pattaya and contributing when I can.
  2. 1 point
    Was Billy Bremner yesterday 🤣🤣🤣
  3. 1 point
    Same. Trying to think who the competition was. Roy Mcfarland was always thought as one of the best in that position.
  4. 1 point
    Obituary from The Times today. it's hidden behind a Paywall got a subscription so cut and pasted it. Brilliant story about Escape to Victory in there. Highly recommended .............. great anecdotes too. Loved it. Enjoy !! Kevin Beattie used to miss school in Carlisle because his parents could not afford to buy him shoes. His pride and joy were the football boots given to him by a kindly teacher. Aged 15, Beattie was clutching those boots in a brown paper bag, his only piece of luggage, when he arrived at Ipswich Town Football Club for a trial in the late 1960s. The club’s manager, Bobby Robson, would later describe him as “the most gifted footballer [he] had seen play in England, other than George Best”. Powerful in the tackle, able to distribute the ball like Bobby Moore and bestride the pitch in the imperious manner of Duncan Edwards, Beattie could play the game at his own pace, the hallmark of a classy player. He was regarded as the quickest player in the country over ten yards. The bull-necked Beattie was also unbeatable in the air and, according to Robson, had a left foot shot like a “howitzer”. He was known to his team-mates as “Monster”. After making his debut against Manchester United in 1972, Beattie became a linchpin during the Suffolk club’s remarkable run of success under Robson. In 1976-77, Ipswich seemed a good bet to win the First Division title before Beattie suffered a freak accident. “I was burning some leaves inside a tin drum and, when the flames appeared to go out, I decided to stoke the fire up with petrol,” he later said. “The flames blew up on me and my face and hair caught fire . . . the boss will tell you to this day that my gardening adventure cost us the championship.” Indeed, Beattie was so indispensable he would be given two cortisone injections before a game and one at half time to settle his deteriorating knee. He featured in the Ipswich team that won the FA Cup in 1978, beating Arsenal 1-0 in the final, but by then he was missing more games than he played. His team-mate Terry Butcher recalled one of Beattie’s final games in 1981 against the Polish side Widzew Lodz during Ipswich’s victorious Uefa Cup campaign. In temperatures approaching minus 30C, Beattie ran on to the frozen pitch in a short-sleeved shirt with his chest pumped out and chastised any team-mate wearing long sleeves, let alone gloves. “He was my hero and my inspiration,” Butcher recalled. “The complete footballer.” One last adventure before Beattie was forced to retire in December 1981 was to act as Michael Caine’s body double in the wartime football film, Escape To Victory. After word went around the set about his strength, the star of the film, Sylvester Stallone, challenged him to an arm wrestle. Beattie won. He later said: “I don’t think he talked to me again for the rest of the film.” Thomas Kevin Beattie was born in Carlisle in 1953, one of nine children and grew up on the Botcherby estate. His father, Tommy, was a drunk. “If he couldn’t have a drink, it was trouble. I would hear the rows, hide under the bed and put my fingers in my ears. There would be times I would have nothing to eat for two or three days unless my dad won a game of dominoes at the pub and got the fish and chips in.” When he signed for Ipswich with a £5 weekly wage, he would send £3 home to his family. “My dad just boozed it away. There were times when he knocked my mam around and in the end I had to come up and sort him out, good and proper. I’m not proud of that. I loved him.” Beattie nearly joined Liverpool, managed by the indomitable Bill Shankly. He went for a trial, but there was nobody to meet him at the station and he took the next train home. Shankly growled that if Beattie did not have the brains to find his way to the club, he was not a Liverpool player. He was next invited to Ipswich and Robson made sure there was someone to meet him at the train station. Having established himself in the first team, the jovial Beattie was particularly loved by the club’s apprentices. He would stand on a table handing out their payslips and reserving an avuncular comment for each one of them. His international career suffered a bad start when he failed to turn up for an England under-23 gathering in Scotland. He was tracked down to a pub in Carlisle playing dominoes with his father. He made his debut for England in 1975 and scored his first international goal against Scotland, but would play just nine times for his country. After retirement, Beattie lost his house, and ended up on benefits. He spiralled into depression and alcohol dependency. He would be seen around the town picking up discarded cigarettes. He contemplated suicide, joking darkly: “I would have tied a hose to my exhaust pipe, but my car had been repossessed.” He contracted pancreatitis at the age of 37 and was so ill a priest was called to administer the last rites. The Professional Footballers’ Association helped him to pay his debts and he worked as a pundit for Radio Suffolk in 2008 while caring for his wife, Maggie, who had multiple sclerosis and was confined to a wheelchair. They had met when Beattie was living in digs in Ipswich and married in 1972. She survives him with their daughters Emma, Sarah and Louise, and six grandchildren. In 2012 Beattie was convicted of fraud for claiming benefits at the same time. He publicly apologised: “I’m a thick footballer and my brains are in my feet. I never meant to let people down.” He should have had more to show for his talent than medals, but he treasured a comment made to him by Shankly: “Ay lad, I haven’t made many mistakes, but you were one of the biggest.” Kevin Beattie, footballer, was born on December 18, 1953. He died of a heart attack on September 16, 2018, aged 64 Football Share
  5. 1 point
    heard him compared with Duncan Edwards.
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