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sinclair1969

Syncing The Carbs On The 750

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The Super Magna went to the dealer's garage Monday morning. Mr. Boy the foreman did the work all by himself. All four carbs taken out everything torn to pieces. The carbs re -vented and new gaskets put in place. Then a vacuum meter was used to sync the carbs. Expert work bike runs much better now. Only a rare misfiring from the pre 1988 CDI system which is the only un original part of the bike. Had to go a long way to borrow the vacuum meter fron another dealership as this is not a standard device any more. Bike handles well at all speeds. Between 2 and 3 thousand rpm engine responds much better now than before. This range was the main problem with uneven running and acceleration before the tuning. Use only genuine 95 gasoline. Gasohol eats up all rubber and gaskets it touches. Unusable on this bike. Running is much smoother now than before and hesitant acceleration a thing of the past. Which was my first consideration. Some photos follow.

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Carb syncing means an equal amount of fuel and air goes through all of them. Out of sync means worse fuel mileage, increased engine temperature, worse throttle response and higher vibration levels.

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Haha.... remembers me my young days in mechanical training........

Mechanical training when you are young stays with you for life. I still remember the things I did in my teens. It also gave me respect for working with your hands.

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I should explain that the mechanic who got the tip is not the owner. He works there for a monthly salary which is not high. I know this and always give him fair tips. Everybody is happy. Me, the mechanic and the shop owner.

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1450 baht. I was happy with that price. Gave him a 500 baht tip on top.

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Sounds a bargain.

With everything fuel injection these days its a dying art setting up carbs.

1450 baht. I was happy with that price. Gave him a 500 baht tip on top.

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Sounds a bargain.

With everything fuel injection these days its a dying art setting up carbs.

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Sounds a bargain.

With everything fuel injection these days its a dying art setting up carbs.

Sounds a bargain.

With everything fuel injection these days its a dying art setting up carbs.

Yes it is. Well done too.

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i have a box in the shed, with timing lights, vac guages. need to find a good home for them. really timing and setting up is now a dying art and I wont be doing it again, shame to see them go to waste.

good to see the mechanic was well trained.

Wow...I wish I had that...pm sent.

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Last year the bike started acting up. The starter would only engage after many trials. Sometimes it took 20 minutes. I started doing research what this could be. On an American forum dedicated to old first and second generation Magnas I found the answer. The starter clutch was shot. Since the bike is old and I love it, I had to get this fixed. The problem is a common one. Mostly it begins after regular usage for 5 to 6 years. In the past it was easily solved. You simply bought another starter clutch from Honda. However there was a hitch. Honda stopped the supply of this part after 20 years. In 2008 they were no longer required to provide such parts if they did not have them in stock. The bike is an 1988 model.

After a long and a difficult search I found a good mechanic who said he also owned some spare parts. Both cylinder head gaskets were blown. How I could still drive the bike in this condition you can only guess. Somewhat like a mistress you love but has become intolerable. But love conquers all. As he was in the middle of the repairs he told me he coukd not get me another starter clutch. But he had a clutch from the 1986 model. It was a bit different but would work. There are two CID's instead of one in the 1988 model. I accepted his offer. Numerous other repairs were done including a new clutch. Also the installation of a new cooling fan. This cooling fan is manually controlled by a small switch. This is I believe a Thai discovery. Do not rely on a heat sensor but determine yourself when to switch the fan on. I like this very much. For example in very slow traffic I switch the fan on since I know the engine is getting hotter now.

The total cost for me was 13500 baht. I was happy with the bike afterward and felt the cost was within normal limits. It took the guy several days. But he did not sync the carbs as he did not have the equipment. Just did it by ear which is a bit less reliable.

So. Bike on...

Thanks to all who participate on this thread.

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With the carbs out I would have got a re jet kit. Change the needles for better throttle response and mid range. I found a stage 1 kit online the other day for my Fazer. Going to order it soon just before my next service and get my local dealer to do it as the carbs will need a balance afterwards.

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Carb syncing means an equal amount of fuel and air goes through all of them. Out of sync means worse fuel mileage, increased engine temperature, worse throttle response and higher vibration levels.

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I think my bird is fuel injected. But tbh, I haven't a clue.....

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I think my bird is fuel injected. But tbh, I haven't a clue.....

Gave me a much needed smile. With the morning coffee.

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With the carbs out I would have got a re jet kit. Change the needles for better throttle response and mid range. I found a stage 1 kit online the other day for my Fazer. Going to order it soon just before my next service and get my local dealer to do it as the carbs will need a balance afterwards.

For sure...and what is better than planning ahead? Personally I have never bought such a kit. But as you say, they are out there. On the Magna forum I saw they offer different kits for different kind of driving. Then there are guys who specialise in tuning and jetting carbs with specific things in mind. Thanks for your comment.

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This thread must be even more boring than most especially for non-motorcycle people. But indeed it has turned out rather well.

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My brother had an old CBX1000, 6 carbs, even Honda told him to go to this old guy in Glasgow who worked from his shed but was a complete master at getting all those carbs balanced.

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My brother had an old CBX1000, 6 carbs, even Honda told him to go to this old guy in Glasgow who worked from his shed but was a complete master at getting all those carbs balanced.

This shows very clearly that good mechanics are few and far between.

CBX1000. A dreambike.

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carb balancing is indeed an art. a lot of it is NOt to do with readings, but listening and feeling. weird but true, you can feel and hear if all is in sync, same as timing

rememeber on older vehicles, the recommended timing settings are all out fo date, as using unleaded changed all that.

So it is like a sixth sense one gets over time. Something similar to you feel something is not right on the bike but you do not yet know what it is.

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Back in the day I am sure you will remember , many bikes only the owner could kick start them right amount of throttle and timing in the kick , in those days engines almost had their own personalities ..

Yes, I remember that.

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Motorcycle owners in this country who do not have their own garage must do things in the open. I mean maintenance work. Considering the climate this is hardly possible for any mentionable stretch of time. So most work gets delegated to others.

As has been pointed out in a comment above carb tuning is an art. It is possible to tune by ear. Seen it done. But bike manuals will not admit it. They include a range of tools and measuring instruments that are a "must". The last time I witnessed tuning by ear and feeling was in January 2012 when the cleaning after the floods took place. That guy was very good. A Thai man in his early fifties who had done motorcycle repair for something like 30 years.

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Very good thread. Remember I had an old MGB with twin SU carbs. Balancing was a long patient job.

Great engine, but always a battle against rusting sills and wings in those days. Became good with a filler knife.

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MGBGT with a V8 was the only one to have.

No rubber bumper shit..lol

Yes they ruined the look of the car with those.

Always wanted a TR6 in those days, but couldn't get insurance. When I could, the TR7 came out which for me, didn't have the grunt of the 6.

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Very good thread. Remember I had an old MGB with twin SU carbs. Balancing was a long patient job.

Great engine, but always a battle against rusting sills and wings in those days. Became good with a filler knife.

Nice. This kind of vehicle is a rarity now I believe.

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