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The Tongue

A Turkey For Christmas

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11 minutes ago, Buckfast said:

I should have gotten into turkey smuggling. Sounds like it would have been profitable. 

Looking at the emaciated Thai turkeys in Makro it indeed would seem a profitable venture. Seems it is not just the Uzbekistani birds being smuggled in....

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Nah no turkey for me, Ive been saving 2 packets of Maggi chicken noodles so will cook them up with some sliced ham from the 7-11.

Edited by Fondles

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I find Turkey a bit bland to be honest, and tend to get a nice shoulder of New Zealand lamb, and a pork joint.  I know that Turkey is traditional, but I am not sure where that came from.  For me, at Xmas time I like to eat and drink things that I really enjoy.   There is always waste with Turkey, unless you make it last for days and then boil the bones for soup. 

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41 minutes ago, mrgreenjeans said:

In the basement, this is how we roll...Happy Holidays guys.

spam_can_open.jpg

I'd prefer to suck the turds from my dogs ass than eat that crap.

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1 hour ago, Uncle Remus said:

I find Turkey a bit bland to be honest, and tend to get a nice shoulder of New Zealand lamb, and a pork joint.  I know that Turkey is traditional, but I am not sure where that came from.  For me, at Xmas time I like to eat and drink things that I really enjoy.   There is always waste with Turkey, unless you make it last for days and then boil the bones for soup. 

From the US the origin of turkey at Thanksgiving comes from the story/legend of the original Thanksgiving of the Pilgrims with the Indians back in Massachusetts.

Which reminds me of the old snub to a New England Yankee bragging of their ancestry dating back to the Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock, i.e., my ancestors met them.

I thought the tradition in England was Christmas goose or duck, or is that just a Dickens story thing? 

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Just now, Buckfast said:

Do you eat a turkey at Christmas? 

Turduken

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Just now, Buckfast said:

I prefer Tamales.

They can make a good appetizer. Haven't seen any good ones in Thailand although Cactus John who makes his own Mexican fare from scratch has made a few that have been edible.

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Just now, Buckfast said:

Where you get a turduken from Herbert's?

I make my own; here one of the neighbors actually raises turkeys. Ducks are plentiful enough but we usually get a small cornish hen or the like from Makro.

But this year we're having a pig roast.

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Same here. I buy a Turducken and a leg of pork each Xmas. Cook them on Xmas morning and then take them over to either Mum's or my brother's house.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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1 hour ago, vpi78 said:

From the US the origin of turkey at Thanksgiving comes from the story/legend of the original Thanksgiving of the Pilgrims with the Indians back in Massachusetts.

Which reminds me of the old snub to a New England Yankee bragging of their ancestry dating back to the Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock, i.e., my ancestors met them.

I thought the tradition in England was Christmas goose or duck, or is that just a Dickens story thing? 

I've only had Christmas goose once, but I'll be damned if it wasn't the best xmas ever.

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Just now, mrgreenjeans said:

I've only had Christmas goose once, but I'll be damned if it wasn't the best xmas ever.

555, a little subtle for non-dickensanians.

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1 hour ago, vpi78 said:

From the US the origin of turkey at Thanksgiving comes from the story/legend of the original Thanksgiving of the Pilgrims with the Indians back in Massachusetts.

Which reminds me of the old snub to a New England Yankee bragging of their ancestry dating back to the Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock, i.e., my ancestors met them.

I thought the tradition in England was Christmas goose or duck, or is that just a Dickens story thing? 

Well a bit of research, suggests that apparently Turkeys were introduced in Britain more than 500 years ago by Yorkshireman William Strickland, who acquired six birds from American Indian traders on his travels.

Before that, people's meat of choice for Christmas was geese, boars' head and even peacocks.

Henry VIII was the first English king to enjoy turkey in the 16th century, although Edward VII made eating turkey fashionable at Christmas.

But even though turkey is now a regular feature on a great majority of British Christmas tables, it has only gone mainstream over the last 60 years.

They made Bernard Mathews a fortune and the greatest Turkey murderer in the history of UK :laugh:

Edited by Uncle Remus

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30 minutes ago, Uncle Remus said:

Well a bit of research, suggests that apparently Turkeys were introduced in Britain more than 500 years ago by Yorkshireman William Strickland, who acquired six birds from American Indian traders on his travels.

Before that, people's meat of choice for Christmas was geese, boars' head and even peacocks.

Henry VIII was the first English king to enjoy turkey in the 16th century, although Edward VII made eating turkey fashionable at Christmas.

But even though turkey is now a regular feature on a great majority of British Christmas tables, it has only gone mainstream over the last 60 years.

They made Bernard Mathews a fortune and the greatest Turkey murderer in the history of UK :laugh:

Makes sense

Thanks

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3 hours ago, Fondles said:

Nah no turkey for me, Ive been saving 2 packets of Maggi chicken noodles so will cook them up with some sliced ham from the 7-11.

Thank god I am not on your invite list...phew......

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10 minutes ago, The Tongue said:

Thank god I am not on your invite list...phew......

I have just added up and this year will be my 13th Xmas in a row in Thailand , eaten many places in that time one of the funniest was Jimmy Macs on Soi 6 , they had a couple of sittings with extra tables in the street was circa 600 baht the food was good funny enough, there was another place closed now opposite JP Court Hotel , Oasis or something about 10 of us went there maybe 10 years ago , ran by a couple of gay guys ....

Funny thinking back at the Xmas days here, landed once Xmas day 2004 that was ....one thing I remember I booked the flight with about a month to go back then it was £1200 for filth and scum class... BA funny enough, had better flight times back then..

The year of the tsunami , 

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As a frog, turkey is not really our thing for Xmas.   The only reason I will spend Xmas in LOS, rather then the kids coming over to HK is the temperature, and the temperature of the water in the swimming pool.....

Love having Boxer day watching Miss Indo in Gstring in the pool !

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33 minutes ago, The Tongue said:

Thank god I am not on your invite list...phew......

Have no fear there is no invite list. I aint done "christmas day" more than maybe a handful of times in the last 30 years and can't say I'll be changing that anytime soon.

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When i was younger, it was always a huge joint of beef that we had on Xmas day, and a lamb roast on Boxing Day!

New years day was a joint of honey roast ham, smothered in whole grain mustard and roasted!!

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although i can eat turkey , its not a favourite of mine . 

i find it a dry meat .

for me the best part of having turkey is having turkey sandwiches late xmas evening or boxing day .

its a rip off anyway, because about 30 % is bones at purchase .

if i could id simply buy several turkey breasts and thats it .

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Just now, mulphy said:

although i can eat turkey , its not a favourite of mine . 

i find it a dry meat .

for me the best part of having turkey is having turkey sandwiches late xmas evening or boxing day .

its a rip off anyway, because about 30 % is bones at purchase .

if i could id simply buy several turkey breasts and thats it .

My old mum had a saying years ago when I said about bones, 

"When you buy land you buy stones when you buy meat you buy bones "

I always  liked the big old Turkey leg , but some could be tough as old boots, It was like a tradition ...

 

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Well, went to another Makro in Pranburi today and they had Capons for sale.  They were around 3 kilos (cost me 252 baht at 80 baht a kilo) which was a good size for a Sunday roast and good value.  Really will just do a dry run on Sunday and if ok I will probably get down there again for another bird.  3 kilo size is good for just myself and Porn and maybe for leftovers for a stew. 

Can't say that I have ever tasted Capon but it just looks like a larger chicken so maybe ok.

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4 hours ago, The Tongue said:

Well, went to another Makro in Pranburi today and they had Capons for sale.  They were around 3 kilos (cost me 252 baht at 80 baht a kilo) which was a good size for a Sunday roast and good value.  Really will just do a dry run on Sunday and if ok I will probably get down there again for another bird.  3 kilo size is good for just myself and Porn and maybe for leftovers for a stew. 

Can't say that I have ever tasted Capon but it just looks like a larger chicken so maybe ok.

Capon is tastier and bit more moist than Turkey IMO.  I believe that a capon is a neutered cockerel 

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a good  pot of vindaloo will do me Christmas and boxing day,unless im in pattaya.in which case I will have a Christmas dinner on boxing day for half the price.

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32 minutes ago, matthewh said:

a good  pot of vindaloo will do me Christmas and boxing day,unless im in pattaya.in which case I will have a Christmas dinner on boxing day for half the price.

I think Christmas is vastly over rated and we should eat and drink what we fancy, just like any other day.  Bah humbug:)

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